Category Archives: Philosophy

Protagoras

In Plato Protagoras seems to be a pompous but likeable old chap who’s dined out on his cleverness for many years. In both Protagoras and Theaetetus he seems to focus on advising young men, both those in power and those … Continue reading

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“The Liturgies of Quakerism” by Ben Pink Dandelion

Perhaps the dullest of book titles. Ever. Especially when received as a Christmas present (one I had asked for…). And I didn’t read it all, as the middle chapters seemed very similar to Pink Dandelion’s more recent and general history … Continue reading

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Plato’s Protagoras

The main trigger to reread this came from my colleague’s teaching it as an A2 Greek text. Expecting Socrates to expose Protagoras as a shallow and mercenary “sophist”, he and his class couldn’t understand how Socrates’ arguments seemed just as … Continue reading

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Ray Monk: “Wittgenstein”

There’s not much left for me now to “get” Wittgenstein beyond, er, reading and thinking about his actual philosophical writings. Monk’s reassuring biography comprehensively tells the/a story of his life, and famously-well weaves in the outlines of the philosophy as … Continue reading

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Gary L. Francione: “An Introduction to Animal Rights”

A powerfully argued, technical and persuasive book: if you think it’s OK to eat animals and wear their skins then best not to read it. Francione’s argument is in two stages. First he reiterates Bentham’s view that animals suffer, so … Continue reading

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Karen Armstrong: “Compassion”

Another book I read so long ago I can’t really remember the details. Hey ho. I read this as part of a discussion group with the Quakers – a chapter a week. Armstrong’s impressive – a muscular thinker and speaker … Continue reading

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Nietzsche’s Ecce Homo

[what follows is, even more than usual for this blog, an amateur reaction from dipping ignorant toes into vast oceans] Visionary, poetic, extreme: Nietzsche and Blake provide book-ends to Romanticism. Both seek to up-end conventional morality, Blake because it represents … Continue reading

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